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The Best Indoor Dog Parks in the United States

Haley photo

Haley

April 03, 2023

City Dog Parks

The Best Indoor Dog Parks in the United States thumbnail

Looking for a space to play with your dog no matter what the weather’s like outside? Look no further than our list of the best indoor dog parks in the United States! These climate-controlled spaces are growing in popularity as pet ownership increases throughout the country. As a bonus, many of them also offer dog training, boarding, grooming, or daycare services on the premises.

This page is about public dog parks and dog businesses and also includes Sniffspot private dog parks. Sniffspot is the largest network of private dog parks for rent in the world. Each of the thousands of Sniffspot dog parks are hosted by locals on private land with 100% private bookings to maximize safety for guests and their dogs. Sniffspot offers various types of dog parks, including indoor options called out here, fenced outdoor fields, water parks, dog beaches, and more. Click here to learn more about Sniffspots near you!

Some Pros and Cons of Indoor Dog Parks

We dive more into safety details and frequently asked questions about dog parks in general at the bottom of this article in our FAQ section. In the meantime, here’s the high level of what you need to know about indoor off-leash areas:

Pro: Indoor parks keep your dog safely contained

Recall training is tough work for any pet — and some breeds of dog have a genetic predisposition to roam. It isn’t safe for your pup to run off into the wilderness (or throughout the neighborhood) unattended… but we all know that off-leash time can be great enrichment and allow for natural behaviors like sniffing.

The solution? Secure areas! Indoor dog parks are one way to provide your dog with an opportunity to stretch their legs without causing you any worry that they’ll escape or get in harm’s way like they might at outdoor parks.

Pro: Indoor dog parks are great options during bad weather

Indoor dog parks are also a great option if you live in an area that’s prone to inclement weather or experiences dramatic seasons, like harsh winters or unbearably humid summers. These off-leash spots are climate controlled regardless of what’s happening outside — making it possible to fulfill and tire your pup out even on the days you’d rather stay cozied up out of the wind, sun, rain, or snow! That's something outdoor dog parks can't offer.

Pro: Indoor parks often have food and drink options

There's a growing trend in the United States: dog park bars (often with food trucks), breweries with craft beer, restaurants, and coffee houses (some even with complimentary coffee). Many of these spaces are set up like a typical business but allow dogs to play off leash in their designated indoor facilities.

Con: Food and drink can make the dog park more dangerous

Food and drink options can be exciting for some social dogs and owners, but it's worth considering a few potential drawbacks of these modern setups, too:

  • The presence of food and drink can increase the chances of dogs showing resource guarding tendencies
  • If owners are distracted with their beverages, they might not supervise their dogs as closely

Con: Indoor dog parks often charge fees

While a few specific parks might charge membership fees, most outdoor city dog parks are free for residents to use. This makes them accessible to anyone who lives nearby and has a dog they're looking to exercise!

An indoor park, on the other hand, is often run by a local business with entrance fees that contribute to upkeep, maintenance, and turning a profit.

Con: Indoor dog parks are often small and can prevent dogs from interacting naturally

While indoor dog parks are great for keeping your dog from running off and for providing enrichment when the weather isn’t favorable, they also have their drawbacks.

For one thing, most indoor dog parks are small in size due to the financial and labor costs of setting up large buildings. There might not be enough space for dogs to interact naturally.

For another, indoor areas can cause some dogs to feel trapped in situations they aren’t comfortable with. It’s possible for nervous pups to be physically cornered with no way to escape an interaction they don’t want — which can lead to a “fight” response when “flight” isn’t an option.

At Sniffspot, we generally don’t recommend taking your dog to small dog parks with other people and pets you don’t know. If your dog is incredibly social and tolerant, they might be a good fit — it’s important to know the risks ahead of time and choose a safe environment for your unique furry friend.

Know Before You Go: Public Dog Park Checklist

What to bring with you to an indoor dog park

Here are a few things to bring with you when visiting any dog park in the United States.

Pack some dog waste bags

Keep your space clean! Always pack a few extra poop bags in case you need to pick up after your pup — and consider scooping any left-behind piles you come across, too. This will make the environment safer for everyone who visits and is especially important in indoor areas.

Bring your own fresh drinking water

Most indoor dog parks offer water bowls or fountains for your dog, but it’s a good idea to pack some of your own just in case. Never leave your dog’s hydration up to chance — it’s easy to forget this in a climate-controlled environment but is just as important as when you’re running hard outside!

Have your pup wear a collar or harness with ID tags

If your dog will be playing with other dogs, it’s important to pay close attention to what they’re wearing. You don’t want anyone’s teeth or paws getting caught in loose fabric or buckles! That said, it’s always a good idea to bring a well-fitted collar or harness along with your dog’s identification tags.

Bring along a leash or two

Along with a collar or harness, bring a leash — yes, even if you’re headed to a designated off-leash area. This way you can keep your dog under control while walking to and from the entrance. You might also consider packing an extra leash in case you need to grab hold of another dog or intervene if a conflict arises.

What to do before going into an indoor dog park

Research the park ahead of time

Read reviews and be on the lookout for any common issues, like unruly dogs or too-tight spaces. Also take note of any entrance fees and additional options, like day passes versus monthly memberships.

It can be hard to find reliable information about some public parks (one reason Sniffspot’s private listings might be a better option) — so when in doubt, don’t risk it. Your dog’s safety and comfort are too important.

Watch the dog park for a few minutes before entering

If possible, take inventory of the other dogs and owners through a window (or talk to fellow pet parents directly if you're able). Is everyone under control? Are the dogs enjoying their play time? Is the area large enough that dogs can take breaks and get space from their playmates if they start to feel overwhelmed? (Crowded spaces can prevent your pet from engaging in natural social behavior.) Ultimately, is there anything about the situation that makes you feel uncomfortable?

Make sure you have basic knowledge of dog body language

This will help you make sure your dog is enjoying their time and keep everyone safe! Know what signs might indicate that your pup is stressed or overwhelmed — and be ready to step in if needed. You can read more about interpreting your dog’s body language in this article.

What area of the country has the best dog parks?

Sniffspot conducted a 2022 survey of dog owners across the country to better understand the state of public dog parks.

The common stereotype is that the east and west coasts are the most dog-friendly regions of our country — but survey results show that public dog parks in the coasts are actually the dirtiest and most dangerous in the country. We found that more than 1 in 7 dog owners report their dogs having been attacked in a public dog park.

The midwest seems to have the safest dog parks in terms of injuries while the east coast has the cleanest public dog parks.

When it comes to indoor options in particular, many dog parks  are concentrated in big cities where high demand can justify the setup expenses.

Sniffspot Dog running on field

Get safe exercise for your dog by renting a private dog park near you

The Best Indoor Dog Parks in the United States

New dog parks are being created every year. While it’s impossible to create a fully comprehensive list — the country has too many off-leash spaces to count! — we’ve compiled some particularly popular indoor dog park options below.

Find indoor dog parks near you

Can’t find a public or private dog park near you? Consider looking on your county or city’s website, reaching out to local dog trainers, or searching Sniffspot listings by your location. (Pro tip: You can filter Sniffspots by whether or not they have an indoor space!)

Dogwood Play Park

  • Address: 12568 33rd Ave NE, Seattle, Washington
  • Hours: 4pm - 9 pm Monday through Friday, 12 pm to 6 pm weekends
  • Off leash? Yes
  • Activities: Off-leash play, taproom on site
  • Entrance fee? $15

The indoor Play Park at Dogwood bar spans across 8000 square feet of social space, complemented by an additional 8000 square feet of outdoor off-leash area. This Play Park is divided into separate sections, both indoors and outdoors, for different types of play activities, including active and gentle play.

Sociability note: This indoor dog park is small in size, which means your dog might not be able to make space from other pets if they aren’t interested in playing. You should only visit if you’re confident your pup is social and tolerant with unfamiliar dogs.

Paws 4 Fun

  • Address: 222 N. 44th Street Lincoln, Nebraska
  • Hours: 7 am - 8 pm
  • Off leash? Yes
  • Activities: Off-leash play, grooming, boarding, training
  • Entrance fee? $10

Paws 4 Fun in Nebraska offers 12,000 square feet of indoor dog park space, consisting of two separate areas for large dogs and two separate areas for small dogs. Each of these parks is with drainage systems, antimicrobial and antibacterial turf designed specifically for dogs, playground equipment, toys, and tunnels. The whole space is fully climate controlled.

Sociability note: This indoor dog park is small in size, which means your dog might not be able to make space from other pets if they aren’t interested in playing. You should only visit if you’re confident your pup is social and tolerant with unfamiliar dogs.

Bar K Dog Bar

  • Address: Locations in Kansas City, St. Louis, and Oklahoma City
  • Hours: Can change by location, usually 9 am - 9 pm
  • Off leash? Yes
  • Activities: Off-leash play, bar on site
  • Entrance fee? $10+ depending on day of week and time of year

Bar K Dog Bar is a bar and restaurant that welcomes dogs for off-leash play in their enclosed, indoor spaces. They have three locations throughout the country.

Sociability note: This indoor dog park is small in size, which means your dog might not be able to make space from other pets if they aren’t interested in playing. You should only visit if you’re confident your pup is social and tolerant with unfamiliar dogs.

JB’s Indoor Dog Park

  • Address: Norwell and Kingston, Massachusetts
  • Hours: Depends on location
  • Off leash? Yes
  • Activities: Off-leash play, grooming
  • Entrance fee? $15 drop in

This indoor dog park has 3,000 square feet of space designed for exercise and playtime. In addition to breed-specific hangouts, pet parents can also rent out the park for special celebrations.

Sociability note: This indoor dog park is small in size, which means your dog might not be able to make space from other pets if they aren’t interested in playing. You should only visit if you’re confident your pup is social and tolerant with unfamiliar dogs.

Fido Fitness Club

  • Address: 910 Railwood Avenue, Woodmere, New York
  • Hours: 7 am - 7 pm
  • Off leash? Yes
  • Activities: Off-leash play
  • Entrance fee? Different membership options

This 8,000-square-foot playground aims to promote fitness for dogs. Fido Fitness Club was designed with a compressed rubber foam floor, allowing pups to play without hurting their joints. Owners need to bring along proof of your dog's vaccination information and have them undergo a behavior review before they can join the club.

Sociability note: This indoor dog park is small in size, which means your dog might not be able to make space from other pets if they aren’t interested in playing. You should only visit if you’re confident your pup is social and tolerant with unfamiliar dogs.

Baxter’s K9 Complex

  • Address: 2903 N St Peters Parkway, St Peters, Missouri
  • Hours: 7 am - 6 pm
  • Off leash? Yes
  • Activities: Off-leash play, daycare, grooming, training
  • Entrance fee? Depends on services chosen

Baxter's K9 Complex indoor dog park provides a range of services from daycare and boarding to training and grooming. Certain programs may require proof of vaccination records and passing a temperament test, so it's a good idea to visit the company's website for more information before heading over.

Sociability note: This indoor dog park is small in size, which means your dog might not be able to make space from other pets if they aren’t interested in playing. You should only visit if you’re confident your pup is social and tolerant with unfamiliar dogs.

Kanine Social

  • Address: 580 College Street, Jacksonville, Florida
  • Hours: 12 pm - 9 pm
  • Off leash? Yes
  • Activities: Off-leash play, bar and coffee on site
  • Entrance fee? $10-15 a day or membership options

Kanine Social is a 14,000-square-foot facility. The indoor section of this dog park is outfitted with special flooring designed to cater to dogs' paws, and it also includes self-bathing stations to help your furry friends get clean after their adventures. Kanine Social also doubles as a taproom, where owners can purchase a variety of different drinks.

Sociability note: This indoor dog park is small in size, which means your dog might not be able to make space from other pets if they aren’t interested in playing. You should only visit if you’re confident your pup is social and tolerant with unfamiliar dogs.

Annie’s Ruff House

  • Address: 1043 N University Blvd, Norman, Oklahoma
  • Hours: 7 am - 7 pm
  • Off leash? Yes
  • Activities: Off-leash play, grooming
  • Entrance fee? Depends on services

Dogs are welcome to play every day of the week at this 5,000-square-foot park in Oklahoma. Annie's Ruff House offers separate sections for small and large dogs, which can help reduce the chance of prey-drive related incidents, along with self-service wash bays.

Sociability note: This indoor dog park is small in size, which means your dog might not be able to make space from other pets if they aren’t interested in playing. You should only visit if you’re confident your pup is social and tolerant with unfamiliar dogs.

The Doggie Den

  • Address: 405 Washington Ave North Kent, Washington
  • Hours: 5 am - 8 pm
  • Off leash? Yes
  • Activities: Off-leash play, daycare, boarding
  • Entrance fee? Varies between services

The Doggie Den is a 5,500-square-foot facility that features both indoor and outdoor play areas along with unique elevated rock structures for your pup to climb and build their confidence. The Doggie Den also provides daily care and boarding services for your furry friend.

Sociability note: This indoor dog park is small in size, which means your dog might not be able to make space from other pets if they aren’t interested in playing. You should only visit if you’re confident your pup is social and tolerant with unfamiliar dogs.

Bow Chika Wow Town

  • Address: 27 Meadow Street, Warwick, Rhode Island
  • Hours: Variable
  • Activities: Off-leash play, daycare, grooming, training
  • Entrance fee? Depends on services you choose

Bow Chika Wow Town established itself as a popular destination for energetic canines with its expansive 13,000-square-foot indoor play area. Furry friends have a blast running, chasing, fetching, and enjoying the provided toys.

Sociability note: This indoor dog park is small in size, which means your dog might not be able to make space from other pets if they aren’t interested in playing. You should only visit if you’re confident your pup is social and tolerant with unfamiliar dogs.

Larkspur Indoor Arena (private Sniffspot dog park)

  • Location: Larkspur, Colorado
  • Size: 98 acres

This fully enclosed, indoor private dog park is open Monday through Friday with options for custom reservations outside of usual operating hours. It’s a massive space to give your dog plenty of room to run no matter what the weather is like outside!

As a bonus, all proceeds from visitors go to supporting the Fostering Love Rescues nonprofit.

Rye Doodle’s Private Dog Park (private Sniffspot dog park)

  • Location: Rapid City, South Dakota
  • Size: 0.06 acres

This indoor arena is fully enclosed with two options to choose from depending on your dog’s needs. Dog waste bags are provided, and reviewers note how safe the private spot feels.

Four Season Fun (private Sniffspot dog park)

  • Location: Port Orchard, Washington
  • Size: 0.5 acres

Come rain or shine and play or train at Four Season Fun! The hosts provide covered parking along with an 800-square-foot area of covered, protected, and padded play space in their pole barn. The SniffSpot is very private and removed from the house. All areas have lights so you can safely play late afternoons during the winter.

Patrick’s Climate Controlled Facility (private Sniffspot dog park)

  • Location: Mesa, Arizona
  • Size: 0.02 acres

This Sniffspot is a climate-controlled indoor training facility regularly used for private and group training sessions. It features rubber floors, toys, and simple agility equipment for your dog to enjoy!

Doggo Adventures Dog Park (private Sniffspot dog park)

  • Location: Grande Prairie, Alberta
  • Size: 0.06 acres

This padded indoor space has a large and medium option for you to reserve based on your dog’s size, play style, and whether or not you’ll be visiting with any friends.

Search all indoor dog park Sniffspot listings

Sniffspot has tons of dog parks — and because they’re private properties hosted by vetted hosts, you’ll never have to worry about incidents with other dogs or people.

Browse all indoor options by clicking this link and filtering by indoor space!

FAQ About Public Dog Parks in the United States

Are public dog parks good for dogs?

It is important for dogs to have off-leash exercise and plenty of opportunities to explore. But the free and open nature of public dog parks can have drawbacks.

Many dog behaviorists discourage visiting public dog parks and recommend Sniffspot's private dog parks. With Sniffspot, dogs can get their exercise safely — without worrying about other dogs, people, or potential disease transmission.

What are the biggest concerns with public dog parks?

While the popularity of dog parks has been skyrocketing in the United States, so has the number of professional trainers who caution against their use. The top risks associated with public off-leash dog parks are that:

  • Dog parks can create an unnatural social environment
  • Busy dog parks can overwhelm shy or nervous dogs
  • Dog parks can exacerbate problem behaviors like leash reactivity
  • Bad experiences at a dog park can also create behavior problems in the first place
  • Public dog parks can lead to physical injuries and illnesses

(Thankfully, private dog parks don’t have these concerns. Learn more about Sniffspot listings in your area here!)

How do public dog parks create an unnatural social environment for dogs?

Many owners are drawn to dog parks because they want to socialize their pets. We’re inundated with messages of the “perfect” friendly dog. Our social media feeds feature viral videos of animal best friends that echo the cutesy movies we loved as children — but they often show a false reality.

While dogs are social mammals, it’s typically not natural for them to regularly engage in play with strangers. Dog sociability can be viewed as a sliding scale:

  • Some dogs are truly dog social. This means they genuinely enjoy interaction with almost every dog they meet! We tend to think these dogs are more common than they really are — they’re the ones we most see out and about because they can handle the widest range of environments.
  • Most dogs are dog tolerant or dog selective. They don’t often seek out new friends, but they can comfortably interact with other dogs when needed after a proper introduction process. (You can read more about properly introducing dogs who don’t know each other in this article.)
  • Some dogs are dog aggressive. They might live with or know a few specific canine friends, but they don’t generally enjoy being around their own species.

Ultimately: It’s perfectly normal for our dogs to not want to play with other pets outside of our families. Renting a private dog park just for your dog and a few trusted friends might be the best option.

How can public dog parks overwhelm shy or nervous dogs?

Owners have great intentions when they bring their nervous dogs to the dog park in hopes of building social skills. Unfortunately, it doesn’t take much for that plan to backfire.

Because dog parks are often busy, chaotic environments, it can be difficult to ensure all interactions are positive. Uncertain dogs are easily overwhelmed by large packs — if the space is fenced-in without adequate space to flee, these pets can quickly feel trapped or resort to the “fight” option of fight-or-flight reactions.

After a few stressful experiences, previously shy dogs can lose trust in their owners and even become fear aggressive.

Sniffspot takes these risks seriously. That’s why all of our private dog park listings are carefully booked to make sure there’s ample time between arrivals and departures — and you can filter listings by whether or not your dog is likely to see any other animals at all, even from afar.

Do public dog parks exacerbate problem behaviors like leash reactivity?

It’s not just nervous dogs who can be harmed by dog park visits — exuberant dogs might struggle in these environments, too.

Many social dogs struggle with excitement-based leash reactivity. When they see another dog, they want to say hi! When the leash prevents them from doing so, they experience something called barrier frustration. Eventually this boils over into an aggressive-looking display that makes it difficult to go on walks or explore public spaces.

While playing with other dogs can be an important part of a social pet’s fulfillment, too much unstructured off-leash time can have unintended consequences when they routinely practice running up to other dogs.

These risks are especially high when owners take their dogs to the dog park with the intent of tiring them out. Pets often arrive in an amped-up, energetic state of mind that impairs good decision making.

Can one bad experience at a public dog park have a lasting effect on a dog?

Even a previously social dog might develop a behavior issue (like fear reactivity) due to a negative interaction with another dog at a public dog park. Perhaps they get subtly bullied, feel overwhelmed, or are even bit — and they decide to preemptively try to keep other dogs away from them. Now your social dog is selective or even aggressive toward others.

While some dogs seem to let those negative interactions roll off their back (especially if they’ve been well socialized since puppyhood) others are affected in lasting ways. Each dog and situation is different.

What are the risks of physical injuries and illnesses at public dog parks?

Public dog parks also increase the chances of pets sustaining injury or developing infection.

Dog park injuries

While many dog-dog injuries at dog parks are accidental — canines can be mismatched in size, inadvertently break skin while wrestling with untrimmed nails, or simply come on too strong without realizing — others are overtly aggressive.

Even friendly dogs can start fights by failing to recognize another pet’s signals of discomfort. Resource guarding over food and toys can turn into a dangerous scuffle. Sometimes heightened arousal from being in a large social group elevates even a typically clear-headed dog’s prey drive.

Dog park illnesses

No matter how hard a city works to keep their parks clean, or how diligently a business sanitizes each day, it’s impossible to fully eliminate all infection risk. This is especially true in dog-designated spaces that see dozens, or perhaps hundreds, of different canines each week.

There’s no way to confirm that every dog entering an off-leash space has been fully vaccinated — and bacterial diseases like leptospirosis often thrive in wet, muddy terrain that’s been torn up by paws.

Young puppies and elderly dogs have the greatest chance of getting sick.

Are all public dog parks dangerous?

While dog parks certainly come with their risks, it would be unfair to claim they’re always a bad idea. Public dog parks do serve an important community service in cities.

Some areas lend themselves to safe interactions better than others — large plots of land with acres to maneuver are less dangerous than fenced-in city runs or indoor dog parks, for example — and responsible owner involvement can make a world of difference.

What are public dog parks good for?

Well-maintained off-leash dog parks can provide dogs and owners with:

  • Biological fulfillment. At their best, dog parks provide an opportunity to fulfill our dogs’ natural canine instincts (running, sniffing, digging, etc.) without impacting others in shared spaces. This can be especially valuable if owners don’t have a yard of their own or walking trails nearby.
  • Playtime. While most dogs don’t want to play with strangers, some particularly outgoing canines might enjoy playing with brand-new friends. A small percentage of truly “dog social” dogs are good candidates for traditional dog parks.
  • Distraction training. Dog parks can be an ideal place to practice advanced training, like recalls, around the distractions of other dogs, people, and nature scents.
  • Owner connections. Many owners enjoy the human social aspect of the dog park — and public spaces enable those relationships without the costs commonly associated with formal group training classes or dog sports practices.

How can I keep my dog safe at a public dog park?

If choosing to use a public park for dogs, you can do a lot to manage your dog’s safety:

  • Make an honest assessment of your dog’s sociability. Are they one of the small portion of dogs that gets along with all other animals?
  • Make sure your dog is up to date on vaccines to protect them against any bugs that may be present in the park.
  • Choose an appropriate public dog park. Make sure that it is large enough and free from obvious hazards.
  • Assess the dog park and other owners before entering. Are there any maintenance issues in the park that could be a problem? Is it overly crowded? Are there owners that are not keeping a close eye on their dog? Are there dogs that could be an issue for your dog or others?
  • Keep a close watch and be an active part of your dog's positive play behavior.

Get your dog the safe enrichment they need by renting a Sniffspot

Sniffspot Dog swimming in pool

FAQ About Private Dog Parks in the United States

Are private dog parks safe?

While public dog parks have a number of safety issues, such as potentially aggressive dogs and disease transmission, Sniffspot dog parks are much safer.

Sniffspot bookings are private for just you and dogs you bring. We require every dog to be vaccinated (or have equivalent titers). All Sniffspot locations are vetted and reviewed by guests so you can find the perfect safe place for you and your dog.

How do I know if a Sniffspot private dog park works for my dog?

You can filter Sniffspot dog parks by fencing and distractions.

  • If your dog is still working on their recall, you can visit one of our fully fenced private dog parks.
  • If your dog is reactive to other dogs, you can visit one of our off-leash areas where there are no dogs audible or visible nearby. You can also filter locations to avoid other domestic animals and people.

We recommend reading reviews and reaching out to the host ahead of time with any questions!

Can I rent a private field for my dog to run?

You sure can! There are Sniffspot fields all over the country where dogs can be off leash safely. Filter for flat, open spaces near you at this link.

Are there private dog agility courses for rent near me?

Sniffspot has dog parks with agility equipment and/or dog obstacles in most cities in the United States. You can filter for these spots at our main listings page.

Haley photo

Haley

April 03, 2023

City Dog Parks

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Sniffspot is a community marketplace that enables anyone to rent land by-the-hour as a safe and private dog park.

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